(Very) Short Films By Kevin Everson

Posted by | Conversations at the Edge | Posted on | October 16, 2003

Thursday, October 16, 2003, 8pm

Kevin Everson in person!

The relentlessness of everyday life, as well as its beauty, is the subject of Kevin Everson’s twenty-odd short films made over the past eight years.  Focusing on working-class African-Americans, these brief, intense works are fictional, but mimic documentary in their naturalism and attention to the material life, tasks and gestures of their protagonists. Correctional officers describe their past and present employment in Eleven Eight Two (1997) and Six Positions (1998); in Merger (1999) a disgruntled bank teller has a system for the morning commute; a poem by Vincent Katz is given visual interpretation in Fumble (2002); set in contemporary Rome, Sportello Quattro (2002) explores immigration, work and community among people of color; Second Shift (1999) reveals a correctional officer’s daily routine of gaining access to the correctional facility; a teenage taxi driver must multitask to keep his job in 72 (2002); in A Week in the Hole (2001) a factory worker adjusts to materials, time and space and personal on his first day on the job; Imported (1999) shows three methods of ridding collard greens of a pesky insect; migration, landscape and elevation are explored in Thermostat (2000); particular sources of luck are the subjects of Pick Six (2001.) and The Daily Number (2001); Vanessa (2002) deals with loss and Michelangelo (Jim Trainor). 1997—2002, Kevin Everson, USA, ca. 70 min, various formats.

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